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're right, there are issues out there. i think it's more about deficit spending where they'll try to earn -- try to get janet yellen to see how far she'll go politically. greenspan a little bit more of a political animal. ben bernanke saying we'll not weigh in on that stuff and we don't know where janet yellen comes down, and saying do you know what, you need to bring down the deficits, how you do it is your problem. >> it raises questions about unemployment. that's the sticking point. that's what investors and traders want to hear from her, the whole issue of forward guidance. if you were still there, what would you recommend? how would you switch policy to get away from the 6 1/2 percent unemployment threshold? >> they've been burned. no other way to put it they've been burned on the 6.5% marker, whatever you want to call it, threshold and they'll back away from that. i would think that janet yellen would want to make maximum use of what will be a honeymoon period. i don't think that anybody is going to be going really after her hard. it's too early to do that. and there's nothing reall
that is buried and driving me crazy which is the decline in the deficit. nobody wants to hear anything about it, because it went from the trillions and you know the president could say we have cut spending here, and maybe because of the gridlock, but there is not a lot of supply of bonds. how about saying that. >> well, there is a decline in the deficit, but i don't know how much of that s is due to th proceeds of fannie mae and freddie mac. >> and the fdic had a good trade in there. good trading by them. >> and we have not talked about it often enough, but we have talked about the lawsuit initiate initiated by perry and berkowitz and ackman owning the common which is up sharply, but they are way past paying them back. and the president -- >> and the president has said that the common -- >> and the third amendment is all in place meaning that all of the profits are e sweeping to the government helping the e deficit. >> it is a windfall due to the rising pricing in housing, but the president said that the common should go to the treasury and he made that statement, and the fdic knew that the pre
term on trying to boost job growth. over the ten-year window you will see steadily declining deficits. at the end the period i think you'll see a declining debt-to-gdp ratio. that's the right trajectory. >> yesterday we had warren buffett on the program. he said he thinks the proposal would be to boost the earned income tax credit even more, expand that in a bigger way. that's a way to boost wages for people that are working without looking at job losses by raising the minimum wage. how about offering it to a wider variety of people and taking the minimum wage proposal off the table? >> these things are not mutually exclusive. there's no reason you can't work at both ends here. >> is it something you would offer if you did a broad -- not what you're talking about right now, but boosting the income tax credit in a big way, offering it across the aisle as a way of finding compromise, in instead of looking at one from another. i think that would be something republicans would take on heartily. >> we're willing to consider any ideas republicans put on the table. the president is putting t
spending. we've gone from deficits to surpluses. we're growing jobs, growing our economy. we're providing once again sources of energy from whatever source it might be, depending upon which state you're in. we're proving these things do work. but we also told him the time it takes to get permits, we would like to have offshore drilling. we would like to have more cooperation from the epa and different federal regulatory entities that take so long to get through. those things are holding jobs back. of course, he has a different philosophy, that the more government spends, the more it will help the economy, which we believe differently. we believe you let people keep more of their hard earned money they're going to spend it back in the economy and create jobs and businesses. >> congress at budget office, nonpartisan, has come out with a study in the last week or so that says basically obamacare is going to cost up to 2.5 million jobs, lost jobs from obamacare, and about 1 million lost jobs in the minimum wage. question, if you know -- if you knew as governor, if your budget bureau told you
has about a $20 billion deficit in energy. most of that comes from russia. one of the main aims -- >> does ukraine have its own domestic sources of energy? >> not much. >> it could. it?x'eeds to be developed. >> i just read a story where that gas company is going to be pulling back, part of their effort to diversify. they tried to do that. one of the aims of western reform will be to get rid of the domestic fuel subsidies, bring it up to a more western level. what does that mean? it means helping pay the bills of average ukrainians. that bill is from russia. if it's rubles or -- no matter how many consonants are in the currency it's still fungible. >> they are in arears by more than $1.5 billion. that first payment goes directly to gas. >> let's talk about another couple stories on your beats. first with you and china, and you maintain that possibly, possibly china is facing a bear stearns kind of moment. >> the first corporate bond defaults in chinese modern history. remember, they didn't issue corporate bonds for a long time because they were communist. there were no corporate
progress made. if we just take a year in review. so, a year in review, in terms of deficit reductions. when the budget came out last year, it was predicted $1.1 trillion. it was 680 in the end. about a $400 billion deficit reduction from 2012 to 2013. then, we have a situation where i think hopefully we've broken the fever on the issues of having conversations about default. >> money that's overseas. are there efforts to bring money overseas permanently back to the states? >> it depends on how one is talking about that. we want to create a system that is clear and that is helpful for our companies to know what they're doing, how they're doing. and not discourage investments from coming back and finances from coming back to the u.s. >> tell me about going from bettenville, arkansas, in the private sector, back to the government. >> walmart is an institution of execution. that is what it is certainly known for. and fortunate to spend time and to be there. coming back to the federal government, certainly, as you reflected, one has to work and work on both sides of the aisle. i go up and down t
of the deficit. if there are things we can do in the administration, the old politics over policy, i think certainly in energy, certainly in several other key areas if we had a better view on policy versus politics, i think we'd see some more robustness. you look at the jobs that are created out of energy and the fracking business, you know, the average employee in theรง marcellus, $95,000 a year. 1.3 million jobs, $63 billion in additional tacks. energy independence is at the heart of getting this gdp up and running. >> growth cures all evil. it's great to see you. >> thank you for the opportunity. >> really appreciate it. >>> we have some breaking news now. bertha coombs, what can you tell us? >> the white house says it's going to allow -- to extend the current customers in the transitional plan yaal plans fo two years. 1.5 million individuals and small businesses. they will be renewable through 2016. also boosting 2015 deductibles and out of pocket costs by 4% and they're extending the open enrollment period for an extra month next year to february 15th. now, the white house deflected
, imbalances you have because of the current account deficits, you need to keep monitoring fiscal policy quite tight. you have to be a lot deeper into the upcoming fiscal year before you see contraction growth and that has to come on the back of implementation of projects, some of the economic reform issues that have been announced since may 2012. >> so i guess may is the key if we're looking for measures like this to be introduced. do you think that's going to be a turning point for the country? >> well, i think there's a few questions about will the government get enough of the mandate and therefore be able to, on the back of that, implement policies, but that remain toes be seen. so it might not be easy for some of the incumbent parties to necessarily muster the vote they need to have. but it's true, post elections, you know, in principal we should be more a possibility to get more on the petition side of these policies, let preoccupation with elections nearing, if you will. the kick start of the investment cycle, all of that cannot be turned on overnight. it takes a while before these type
remained overvalued despite an account deficit. >> reporter: the debt of the country has been falling, though, as a result, yields have been rising. they're not worried you're not going to be able to reservice it. are you worried about a restructuring? >> we are not worried, but ukraine needs external help for the next year or two. i think with sensible economic policies and with international support from the imf, u.s. and the eu, we can return to the market back within six months, maximum. >> reporter: if you listen to a discussion about ukraine and the united states, it's all about this is the eu or russia, a forced choice, some kind of big monumental decision for ukraine. do you see it so divided, choosing between eu and russia? >> ukrainians would not want to make it look like this. it wants help from all of its neighbors including russia and on the other side, but the majority of the population definitely supports european standards of business, democracy, free market economy. >> reporter: thanks so much for joining us, mr. fiala. we really appreciate it. tomas fiala, ceo of dra
so we expect the lira, the current deficit is an issue in turkey and we expect the currency to remain weak so we have to consider that when making investment proposals, we have to assume a little bit of, not a currency strengthening anyway, probably weakening if anything and brazil is a problem for currency from that point of view and equally as a sterling uk investor we find the dollar quite cheap so we find u.s. assets quite interesting at the moment. what goes around comes around i guess. >> reporter: thank you very much for joining us. julia, that is from here. we'll be back in an hour with another interview. for now pack over to you. >> thank you, great to chat to you. >>> the bitcoin exchange mt. gox received a subpoena from prosecutors in new york, asked the company to preserve certain documents. ceo mark capellas issued a statement saying the business is at a turning point. japanese authorities are looking into the matter but don't have jurisdiction after the mt. gox website went down. >>> still to come, the british economy returns to focus as investors await the second meetin
that had obviously unsustainable balance of payment situations and that had current account deficits and that needed to have some kind of sell-off to rebalance and other countries where the fundamentals were fine. frankly, it seems like those fears weren't born out. i'm wondering what you think of the dynamic now give whatn what happening and in particular whether or not you think that this is going to have contagion effects elsewhere. >> this is an important question. the emerging markets are in the middle of a major capital outflow. i think some of the data shows that there's been money leaving emerging markets for over 15 weeks already now. >> 18. >> 18 weeks. and i think that we shouldn't expect this to change the matters very much. i think rebecca's question was spot on. how much has the russian action over the weekend really changed the macroeconomic situation and i think very little. i think that applies to the emerging markets as an asset class as well. >> but let me say something. it hasn't changed the macrosituation but it has changed the approach to risk. look what's going
't have enough import to fund our consumption or enough saving to support our deficit. what are we going to do if china changes and we don't. >> but i gather that you think they're on the ascendency and we are clearly on the decline. that is the -- i will say, that was my takeaway. >> they are rebalancing their model to keep the growth and development story going and that will certainly take them to a larger scale of their economy than ours, at some point in the next five to ten years. >> gdp. >> their per capta gdp, joe, is going to be increasing, but at a much slower pace. for a long time. >> multiplied out and that's why it's bigger. >> for a long time. are we on the decline? that's the big debate in america. we continue to undersave, underinvest in people, infrastructure, and capacity. and if we don't get that together, then their ascendency will coincide with our decline. >> we've had periods like this before. >> yeah. >> i mean, you're optimistic we get it together or do you think we're the roman empire? >> no, look, i hope we get it together. what i don't see is a debate on the st
to have it happen during -- when things were terrible five years ago. but we can have a deficit which creates more debt but not at a rate that this grows faster than gdp grows. if gdp is going to grow at 2% in real terms, but the fed has a policy that they're shooting for 2% inflation on top of that, that would mean 4% in terms of nominal gdp and you literally could have debt grow at 4% and it would maintain the same relationship to no, ma'amal gdp as it does now. the trend is wrong. there is a danger of that goes wrong. i don't like seeing it go up as a percentage of gdp. this country is in wonderful shape. >> if you say government pensions aren't the problem because the government has the power to tax, what do you say to somebody who has a private pension? should they be worried about it? should they think they are still going to get it when they retire. >> it's protected by the pension benefit guarantee corps. that has come into play in many pension plans. the state municipal pension plans, the one right here in omaha, is in terrible shape. and almost out of resources. it's a healt
that the deficit is going down. who wouldn't hope for that? we hope for it. it's working. but any time you look at what they're doing, it's all short term. the stuff that's going to eat our lunch is 10,000 people a day turning 65. you've got a system that was set up of social security that you won't even address the insolvency of it for 75 years. health care is on automatic pilot. forget what you call it. it's time to deal with the long-term stuff before interest goes from where it is now to back to historical heights and then watch people grab their socks and run for blocks. >> is there anything you think can be done considering that it probably won't be implemented until after the november 2014 midterms? >> anything that will be done will be done down the road. that's what's wrong with the health care plan. whatever it is is all the correction process is down the road, way ahead. and it's like a dock fix. you're going to do another dock fix and they will run in. you're going to do anything. whatever you do, whether it's tort reform or real estate or whatever is done, the groups will organize
talk about deficits and debt. we could talk about data. but in the end, treasuries really when it gets nasty, when that tina the only -- that there is no alternative to stocks, that changes rather abruptly when stocks go down. and then tina becomes there is no alternative to being long treasuries. we want to keep cognizant of that. to the end the japanese are doing everything in their power to keep the yen weak, let's look at how all that stimulus and various ways they're trying to goose their economy have panned out. one way they've made good strides on. currently the latest reads is 3.7. now, that is the basic lowest rates since july of '07. during that interim period between '07 and now the high was 5.5. the message to this is is that the japanese may have issues for the last 25 years. but huge high unemployment certainly does not seem to be one of them but they made some inroads. base wage, recent data. this is important. base wages were only up 1/10 year over year. one of the things they're trying to do is goose inflation. if you adjust the wages for inflatio
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15